OTHER RECENT ARTICLES

Academic Leadership. Shot of a two executives working together in an office June 19

When Academic Leadership Comes with Baggage

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The baggage we bring to work with us can take a variety of forms. It could occur because we applied for our positions as internal candidates and suddenly find ourselves as bosses of the very people who only a short time ago we regarded as close friends. It could occur because we find ourselves in charge of a department or college in which a current or former mentor, romantic partner, or spouse works. It could occur because we develop a special affinity for someone who reports to us—or to whom we report—and we need to set aside those personal feelings when it comes to making a decision. In all too many cases, baggage places us in a lose-lose situation. If you decide in favor of your friend/lover/mentor, you’ll be accused of playing favorites. If you make a decision to that person’s detriment, the personal relationship could easily be strained.


Enrollment Management June 16

Five Recommendations to Advance Careers in Enrollment and Retention Management

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Whether you are an entry-level admission officer or an assistant or associate enrollment manager, you will, at some point in your career, desire to move to the next professional level, either at your current school or at another college or university. These five recommendations may help you make a successful transition.


Analytics for Student Retention June 14

The Power of Predictive Analytics for Student Retention

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What if you could use data you already collect to identify which entering students are most at risk of leaving your institution, allowing you to target the most appropriate services to populations that need them? This is exactly what Eastern Connecticut State University is doing.
Rhona Free, Eastern’s vice president of academic affairs, explains that the university’s retention program allows it to “use data that most people already have” to determine why students are leaving campus, and perhaps higher education altogether, and take preventive steps.


Consumer liability in higher education. Finance concept. Plastic toy businessman standing on top of block letter word - RISK.Similar images - June 12

Consumer Liability 101: Six Areas to Watch, Part II

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While state consumer protection laws vary, there are certain defenses to liability that are common enough—and powerful enough—that all schools should be familiar with them. These defenses are (i) preserving and protecting your educational mission; (ii) acting in accordance with regulatory requirements; and (iii) for state schools, preserving and protecting sovereign immunity.


Consumer liability June 9

Consumer Liability 101: 6 Areas to Watch, Part I

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Students considering litigation against colleges and universities have powerful legal tools at their disposal: state consumer protection laws. These laws were designed to empower states and consumers to bring claims against companies that act unfairly or deceptively. Although the requirements of these laws vary from state to state, most allow consumers that prevail in litigation to recover not only compensatory damages but also reasonable attorneys’ fees and double or treble damages. The availability of such remedies makes it easier for consumers to find legal representation and encourages them to bring their claims to court.


Excellence in Online Leadership June 7

Hallmarks of Excellence in Online Leadership

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Online learning has “gone from a wild frontier to a more established professional [undertaking],” says Jay Halfond of Boston University, Senior Fellow of the UPCEA Center for Online Leadership and Strategy and Chair of the National Task Force on the UPCEA Hallmarks of Excellence in Online Leadership. As the field of online education has matured, the need has arisen for standards and benchmarks that challenge university leaders to hold themselves accountable to practices that demonstrate commitment to online education and its place in the university.


Motivational Interviewing June 2

Using Motivational Interviewing to Engage Faculty and Facilitate Change

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Motivational Interviewing (MI) is a collaborative communication style, developed in the field of clinical psychology, for strengthening an individual’s intrinsic motivation and commitment to change. Within an atmosphere of acceptance, compassion, and empowerment, people’s ambivalence about change is identified and explored by evoking their own reasons to change with respect to their values and goals. Thirty years of research shows this approach to be effective in facilitating behavior changes in contexts ranging from substance abusers entering treatment to dietary changes in diabetics, medication compliance in cardiovascular disease, and increasing water sanitation practices in remote South African villages, among others. More recently, MI has been brought into the context of organizational change, including academia.